Blog

Tracking Sandy Exhibit

I am not the common history major, at least not at Monmouth University. As a South American immigrant, English is not my first language and I have only been exposed to American history beginning my sophomore year of high school. This means I’ve spent significantly less time learning it than

Immigrants & Oral History

Oral History in the Mid-Atlantic Region (OHMAR) and the Immigrant and Ethnic History Society (IEHS) presented a workshop at Monmouth University on September 15th, 2017 that left the attendees ready to dig into their own projects. Professor Melissa Ziobro of Monmouth University hosted Anne Rush

Oral History – Not Just for History Majors

Being a first-year student can be intimidating and frightening. You might have no friends on campus, and if you commute, like me, it can be hard to make them. My point is that it can be scary, and it’s hard to get out there and make a name for yourself or participate at all, let […]

Perspectives at the OHMAR Annual Conference

At the end of April, I had the opportunity to attend the Friday session of the OHMAR 2017 annual conference “Oral History & the City” at Columbia University. Besides the fact that this was a unique conference itself from the astounding presentations to the genderless #RESISTANCE hats taped

Oral History at Opera Philadelphia

On September 16, 2017, Opera Philadelphia will premiere We Shall Not Be Moved, a new opera by composer Daniel Bernard Roumain, librettist Marc Bamuthi Joseph, and director/choreographer Bill T. Jones. The production is an outgrowth of Hip H’opera, a partnership between Opera Philadelphia and

School of Rock

Housed on the campus of Monmouth University in West Long Branch, NJ, The Bruce Springsteen Special Collection and Archive comprises nearly 35,000 items from 48 countries. These range from books and concert memorabilia to articles and promotional materials, serving “the research and

Giving Back and Moving Forward

We’re living through an historic moment. Whatever your political persuasion, your constitutional sensibility, your race, economic status, gender, sexual orientation, or country of origin, this recent election cycle has created a cultural and political watershed, and only in hindsight will we be

Balancing Act

Two years ago I began teaching an oral history course in which students interview recent immigrants to the Washington DC area. Students and interviewees have the option to donate their interviews and transcripts to the Immigrant Voices archive at the University of Maryland’s Center for the

Oral History: Where does it fit in museums?

The theme for this year’s OHMAR conference was “Oral History & Technology,” and participants presented their ideas on how evolving technologies can be applied to creating and sharing oral histories with the public. For my first OHMAR conference as a board member, I was excited to facilitate